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The Sears "Community" Installation of ComScore

January 1, 2008


Late last month, Benjamin Googins (a senior researcher in the Anti-Spyware unit at Computer Associates) critiqued a ComScore installation performed by Sears' "Sears Holdings Community" ("My SHC Community" or "SHC"). After reviewing the installation sequence, Ben concluded that the installation offered "very little mention of software or tracking" and otherwise fell short of CA and industry standards. I agree.

I write today to add my own critique. I begin by presenting the entire installation sequence in screenshots and video. I then explain why the limited notice provided falls far short of the standards the FTC has established. Finally, I show that Sears' claims of adequate notice are demonstrably false.

 

The SHC Installation Sequence

The SHC installation proceeds in four steps:

1) An email from Sears after a user provides an address at Sears.com. In seven paragraphs plus a set of bullet points, 582 words in total, the email describes the SHC service in general terms. But the paragraphs' topic sentences make no mention of any downloadable software, nor do the bullet points offer even a general description of what the software does. The only disclosure of the software's effects comes midway through the fourth paragraph, where the program is described as "research software [that] will confidentially track your online browsing." Sophisticated users who notice this text will probably abandon installation and proceed no further. But novices may mistakenly think the tracking is specific to Sears sites: SHC is a research program offered by Sears, so it is difficult to understand why tracking would occur elsewhere. Furthermore, the quoted text appears midway through a paragraph -- in no way brought to users' attention via topic sentences, headings, section formatting, or other labels. So it's strikingly easy to miss.

2) If a user presses the "Join" button in the email, the user is taken to a SHC web-based installation sequence that further details SHC's offerings. The first page describes some aspects of SHC in reasonable detail -- with six prominent and clear bullet points. Yet nowhere does this text make any mention whatsoever of downloadable software, market research, or other tracking.

3) Pressing "Join" in the SHC screen takes a user to a "Welcome to My SHC Community" page which requests the user's name, address, and household size. The page then presents a document labeled "Privacy Statement and User License Agreement" -- 2,971 words of text, shown in a small scroll box with just ten lines visible, requiring fully 54 on-screen pages to view in full. The initial screen of text is consistent with the "privacy statement" heading: The visible text indicates that the document describes "what information [SHC] gather[s and] how [SHC] use[s] it" -- typical subjects for a privacy policy. But despite the title and the first screen of text, the document actually proceeds to an entirely different subject, namely downloadable software and its far-reaching effects: The tenth page admits that the application "monitors all of the Internet behavior that occurs on the computer on which you install the application, including ... filling a shopping basket, completing an application form, or checking your ... personal financial or health information." That's remarkably comprehensive tracking -- but mentioned in a disclosure few users are likely to find, since few users will read through to page 10 of the license.

    Within the Privacy Statement section, a link labeled "Printable version" offers users a full-screen version of the document, requiring "only" ten on-screen pages on my test PC. But nothing in the Privacy Statement caption or visible text suggests that the document merits such thorough review. Due to the labeling and the first screen of text, few users will see any need to click through to the full-screen version.

4) A user next arrives at a screen labeled "You're almost finished!" Clicking "Next" triggers an ActiveX screen offering an unnamed program, signed by a company called TMRG, Inc. (nowhere previously mentioned in the installation sequence), authenticated by Thawte (part of VeriSign). Pressing Yes in the ActiveX yields an installation program with no further opportunity to cancel installation. Packet sniffer analysis confirms that ComScore software is installed.

See also a video of the installation sequence.

 

Relevant FTC Rules

The FTC's recent settlements with Direct Revenue and Zango explain the disclosure and consent required before installing tracking software on users' computers. To install such software on users' PCs, vendors must obtain "express consent" -- defined to require "clear[] and prominent[] disclos[ure of] the material terms of such software ... including the nature and purpose of the program and the effects it will have ... prior to the display of, and separate from, any final End User License Agreement." "Clear[] and prominent[]" installations are defined to be those that are "unavoidable", among other requirements.

The Sears SHC installation of ComScore falls far short of these rules. The limited SHC disclosure provided by email lacks the required specificity as to the nature, purpose, and effects of the ComScore software. Nor is that disclosure "unavoidable," in that the key text appears midway through a paragraph, without a heading or even a topic sentence to alert users to the important (albeit vague) information that follows.

The disclosure provided within the Privacy Statement and User License Agreement also cannot satisfy the FTC's requirements. The FTC demands a disclosure "prior to ... and separate from" any license agreement, whereas the only disclosure on this page occurs within the license agreement -- exactly contrary to FTC instructions. Furthermore, users can easiliy overlook text on page ten of a lengthy license agreement. Such text is the opposite of "unavoidable."

The SHC/ComScore violation could hardly be simpler. The FTC requires that software makers and distributors provide clear, prominent, unavoidable notice of the key terms. SHC's installation of ComScore did nothing of the kind.

 

Other Installation Deficiencies

Beyond the problems set out above, the SHC installation also falls short in other important respects.

Failure to provide the promised additional information. Sears' initial email promises that "during the registration process, you'll learn more about this application software." In fact, no such information is provided in the visible, on-screen installation sequence. Based on this false promise and users' general experience, users may reasonably expect that the download link in step 4 will offer additional information about the software at issue, along with an opportunity to cancel installation if desired. In fact no such information is ever provided, nor do users have any such opportunity to cancel.

Choosing little-known product names that prevent users from learning more. The initial SHC email refers to the ComScore software as "VoiceFive." The license agreement refers to the ComScore software as "our application" and "this application." The ActiveX prompt gives no product name, and it reports company name "TMRG, Inc." These conflicting names prevent users from figuring out what software they are asked to accept. Furthermore, none of these names gives users any easy way to determine what the software is or what it does. In contrast, if SHC used the company name "ComScore" or the product name "RelevantKnowledge," users could run a search at any search engine. These confusing name-changes fit the trend among spyware vendors: Consider Direct Revenue's dozens of names (AmazingMerchants, BestDeals, Coolshopping, IPInsight, Blackone Data, Tps108, VX2, etc.).

 

Critiquing Sears SHC's Response

To my surprise, Sears defends the practices described above. In a reply to CA's Ben Googins, Sears SHC VP Rob Harles claims that SHC "goes to great lengths to describe the tracking aspect." In particular, Harles says "[c]lear notice appears in the invitation", "on the first signup page", and "in the privacy policy and user licensing agreement."

I emphatically disagree. The email invitation provides vague notice midway through a lengthy paragraph that, according to its topic sentence, is otherwise about another topic. The first signup page makes no mention at all of any downloadable software. The privacy policy and license agreement describe the application only in the tenth page of text -- where few users are likely to find the disclosures.

Harles further claims that the installer provides "a progress bar that they [users] can abort." Again, I disagree. The video and screenshots are unambiguous: The SHC installer shows no progress bar and offers no abort button.

 

The Installation in Context

In June 2007, I showed other examples of ComScore software installing without consent -- including multiple installations through security exploits. TRUSTe responded by removing ComScore's RelevantKnowledge from TRUSTe's Trusted Download Program for three months. Now that more than five months have elapsed, I expect that ComScore is seeking readmission. But the installation shown above stands in stark contrast to TRUSTe Trusted Download rules. See especially the requirement that primary notice be "clear, prominent and unavoidable" (Schedule A, sections 3.(a).(iii) and 1.(hh)).

Why so many problems for ComScore? The basic challenge is that users don't want ComScore software. ComScore offers users nothing sufficiently valuable to compensate them for the serious privacy invasion ComScore's software entails. There's no good reason why users should share information about their browsing, purchasing, and other online activities. So time and time again, ComScore and its partners resort to trickery (or worse) to get their software onto users' PCs.