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Passenger Right to Record at Airports and on Airplanes?

June 20, 2017


Passengers have every reason to record airline staff and onboard events—documenting onboard disputes (such as whether a passenger is in fact disruptive or a service animal disobedient), service deficiencies (perhaps a broken seat or inoperational screen), and controversial remarks from airline personnel (like statements of supposed rules, which not match actual contract provisions). For the largest five US airlines, no contract provision—general tariff, conditions of carriage, or fare rules—prohibits such recordings. Yet airline staff widely tell passengers that they may not record—citing "policies" passengers couldn't reasonably know and certainly didn't agree to in the usual contract sense. (For example, United's policy is a web page not mentioned in the online purchase process. American puts its anti-recording policy in its inflight magazine, where passengers only learn it once onboard.) If passengers refuse to comply, airline staff have threatened all manner of sanctions including denial of transport and arrest. In one incident in July 2016, a Delta gate agent even assaulted a 12-year-old passenger who was recording her remarks.

In a Petition for Rulemaking filed this week with the US Department of Transportation, Mike Borsetti and I ask DOT to affirm that passengers have the right to record what they lawfully see and hear on and around aircraft. We explain why such recordings are in the public interest, and we present the troubling experiences of passengers who have tried to record but have been punished for doing so. We conclude with specific proposed provisions to protect passenger rights.

One need not look far to see the impact of passenger recordings. When United summoned security officers who assaulted passenger David Dao, who had done nothing worse than peacefully remain in the seat he had paid for, five passenger recordings provided the crucial proof to rebut the officers' false claim that Dao was "swinging his arms up and down with a closed fist," then "started flailing and fighting" as he was removed (not to mention United CEO Oscar Munoz's false contention that Dao was "disruptive and belligerent"). Dao and the interested public are fortunate that video disproved these allegations. But imagine if United had demanded that other passengers onboard turn off their cameras before security officers boarded, or delete their recordings afterward and prove that they had done so, all consistent with passengers experiences we report in our Petition for Rulemaking. Had United made such demands, the false allegations would have gone unchallenged and justice would not have been done. Hence our insistence that recordings are proper even—indeed, especially—without the permission of the airline staff, security officers, and others who are recorded.

Our filing:
  Petition for Rulemaking: Passenger Right to Record

DOT docket with public comment submission form